Publications

 

 

Stimuli

Stimuli used in Brown & Marsh (2009), "Creating illusions of past encounter through brief exposure".

Stimuli used in Marsh (2004), "Story stimuli for creating false beliefs about the world".

Journal Articles

In press

Butler, A. C., Black-Meier, A. C., Raley, N. D., & Marsh, E. J. (in press). Applying knowledge to different contexts during retrieval practice promotes transfer of learning. Journal of Educational Psychology.

Marsh, E. J. (in press). Family Matters: Fame through one’s academic descendents. Perspectives on Psychological Science.

2017

Cantor, A. D., & Marsh, E. J. (2016). Expertise effects in the Moses Illusion: Detecting contradictions with stored knowledge. Memory, 25:2, 220-230.

Arnold, K. A., Umanath, S., Thio, K., Reilly, W., McDaniel, M., & Marsh, E. J. (2017). Understanding the cognitive processes involved in writing to learn. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 23, 115-127.

Brashier, N. M., Umanath, S., Cabeza, R. C., & Marsh, E. J. (2017). Competing Cues: Older Adults Rely on Knowledge in the Face of Fluency. Psychology and Aging, 32, 331-337.

2016

Arnold, K. M., Daniel, D. B., Jensen, J., McDaniel, M., & Marsh, E. J. (2016). Structure building predicts grades in college Psychology and Biology. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 30, 454-459. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3226

Mullet, H. G., & Marsh, E. J. (2016). Correcting false memories: Errors must be noticed and replaced. Memory & Cognition, 44, 403-412. http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-015-0571-x

Wang, W-C., Brashier, N. M., Wing, E. A., Marsh, E. J., & Cabeza, R. C. (2016). On known unknowns: Fluency and the neural mechanisms of the illusory truth effect. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 28, 739-746. http://dx.doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_00923

2015

Brown, A. S., Caderao, K. C., Fields, L. M., & Marsh, E. J. (2015). Borrowing personal memories. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 29, 471-477. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3130

Cantor, A. D., Eslick, A. N., Marsh, E. J. , Bjork, R. A., & Bjork, E. L. (2015). Multiple-choice tests stabilize access to marginal knowledge. Memory & Cognition, 43, 193-205. http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-014-0462-6

Deffler, S. A., Brown, A. S., & Marsh, E. J. (2015). Judging the familiarity of strangers: Does the context matter? Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 22, 1041-1047.

Fazio, L. K., Brashier, N. M., Payne, B. K., & Marsh, E. J. (2015). Knowledge does not protect against illusory truth. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 144, 993-1002. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xge0000098

Fazio, L. K., Dolan, P. O., & Marsh, E. J. (2015). Learning misinformation from fictional sources: Understanding the contributions of transportation and item-specific processing. Memory, 23, 166-167. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2013.877146

2014

Butler, A. C., Marsh, E. J., Slavinsky, J. P., & Baraniuk, R. G. (2014). Integrating Cognitive Science and Technology Improves Learning in a STEM Classroom. Educational Psychology Review, 26, 331-340. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10648-014-9256-4

Mullet, H. G., Butler, A. C., Verdin, B., von Borries, R., & Marsh, E. J. (2014). Delaying feedback promotes transfer of knowledge despite student preferences to receive feedback immediately. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 3, 222-229. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jarmac.2014.05.001

Mullet, H. G., Umanath, S., & Marsh, E. J. (2014). Recent study, but not retrieval, of knowledge protects against learning errors. Memory & Cognition, 42, 1239-1249. http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-014-0437-7

Umanath, S., Dolan, P. O., & Marsh, E. J. (2014). Aging and the Moses Illusion: Older adults fall for Moses but if asked directly, stick with Noah. Memory, 22, 481-492. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2013.799701

Umanath, S., & Marsh, E. J. (2014). Understanding how prior knowledge influences memory in older adults. Perspectives on Psychological Science , 9, 408-426. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1745691614535933

2013

Butler, A. C., Godbole, N., & Marsh, E. J. (2013). Explanation feedback is better than correct answer feedback for promoting transfer of learning. Journal of Educational Psychology, 105, 290-298. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0031026

Dunlosky, J., Rawson, K. A., Marsh, E. J., Nathan, M. J., & Willingham, D. T. (2013). Improving students' learning and comprehension: Promising directions from cognitive and educational psychology. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 14, 4-58. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1529100612453266

Fazio, L. K., Barber, S. J., Rajaram, S., Ornstein, P. A., & Marsh, E. J. (2013). Creating illusions of knowledge: Learning errors that contradict prior knowledge. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 142, 1-5. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0028649

Goswick, A. E., Mullet, H. G., & Marsh, E. J. (2013). Suggestibility from stories: Can production difficulties and source monitoring explain a developmental reversal? Journal of Cognition and Development, 14, 607-616. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2012.710864

Slavinsky, J. P., Davenport, K. J., Butler, A. C., Marsh, E. J., & Baraniuk, R. G. (2013). Open online platforms advancing DSP education. 2013 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP), 8771-8775. http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICASSP.2013.6639379

Wing, E. A., Marsh, E. J., & Cabeza, R. (2013). Neural correlates of retrieval-based memory enhancement: an fMRI study of the testing effect. Neuropsychologica, 51, 2360–2370. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.04.004

2012

Butler, A. C., Dennis, N. A., & Marsh, E. J. (2012). Inferring facts from fiction: Reading correct and incorrect information affects memory for related information. Memory, 20, 487-498. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2012.682067

Marsh, E. J., Butler, A. C., & Umanath, S. (2012). Using fictional sources in the classroom: Applications from cognitive psychology. Educational Psychology Review, 24, 449-469. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10648-012-9204-0

Marsh, E. J., Lozito, J. P., Umanath, S., Bjork, E. L., & Bjork, R. A. (2012). Using verification feedback to correct errors made on a multiple-choice test. Memory, 20, 645-653. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2012.684882

Umanath, S., Butler, A. C., & Marsh, E. J. (2012). Positive and negative effects of monitoring popular films for historical inaccuracies. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 26, 556-567. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.2827

Umanath, S. & Marsh, E. J. (2012). Aging and the memorial consequences of catching contradictions with prior knowledge. Psychology & Aging, 27, 1033-1038. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0027242

2011

Butler, A. C., Fazio, L. F., & Marsh, E. J. (2011). The hypercorrection effect persists over a week, but high confidence errors return. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 18, 1238-1244. http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13423-011-0173-y

Eslick, A. N., Fazio, L. K., & Marsh, E. J. (2011). Ironic effects of drawing attention to story errors. Memory, 19, 184-191. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2010.54390

2010

Bottoms, H. C., Eslick, A. N., & Marsh, E. J. (2010). Memory and the Moses Illusion: Failures to detect contradictions with stored knowledge yield negative memorial consequences. Memory, 18, 670-678. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2010.501558

Fazio, L. K., Agarwal, P. K., Marsh, E. J., & Roediger, H. L., III (2010). Memorial consequences of multiple-choice testing on immediate and delayed tests. Memory & Cognition, 38, 407-418. http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/MC.38.4.407

Fazio, L. K., Huelser, B. J., Johnson, A., & Marsh, E. J. (2010). Receiving right/wrong feedback: Consequences for learning. Memory, 18, 335-350. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09658211003652491

Fazio, L. K., & Marsh, E. J. (2010). Correcting false memories. Psychological Science, 21, 801-803. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797610371341

Marsh, E. J., & Sink, H. E. (2010). Access to handouts of presentation slides during lecture: Consequences for learning. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 24, 691-706. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1579

2009

Brown, A. S., & Marsh, E. J. (2009). Creating illusions of past encounter through brief exposure. Psychological Science, 20, 534-538. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9280.2009.02337.x

Fazio, L. K., & Marsh, E. J. (2009). Surprising feedback improves later memory. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16, 88-92. http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/PBR.16.1.88

Marsh, E. J., Agarwal, P., & Roediger, H. L., III (2009). Memorial consequences of answering SAT II questions. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 15, 1-11. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0014721

2008

Barber, S. J., Rajaram, S., & Marsh, E. J. (2008). Fact learning: How information accuracy, delay, and repeated testing change retention and retrieval experience. Memory, 16, 934-946. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09658210802360603

Brown, A. S., & Marsh, E. J. (2008). Evoking false beliefs about autobiographical experience. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 15, 186-190. http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/PBR.15.1.186

Fazio, L.K., & Marsh, E. J.(2008). Older, not younger, childern learn more from false facts from stories. Cognition, 106, 1081-1089. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2007.04.012

Fazio, L. K., & Marsh, E. J. (2008). Slowing presentation time increases, rather than decreases, errors learned from fictional stories. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 15, 180-185. http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/PBR.15.1.180

2007

Marsh, E. J. (2007). Retelling is not the same as recalling: Implications for Memory. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 16, 16-20. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8721.2007.00467.x

Marsh, E. J., Roediger, H. L., III, Bjork, R. A., & Bjork, E. L. (2007). Memorial consequences of multiple-choice testing. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 14, 194-199. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8721.2007.00467.x

2006

Butler, A. C., Marsh, E. J., Good, M. K., & Roediger, H. L., III (2006). When additional multiple-choice lures aid versus hinder later memory. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 20, 941-956. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1239

Marsh, E. J. (2006). When does generation enhance memory for location? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 32, 1216-1220. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0278-7393.32.5.1216

Marsh, E. J., & Fazio, L. K. (2006). Learning errors from fiction: Difficulties in reducing reliance on fictional stories. Memory & Cognition, 34, 1140-1149. http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/BF03193260

2005

Marsh, E. J., Balota, D.A., & Roediger, H.L., III (2005). Learning facts from fiction: Effects of healthy aging and early-stage dementia of the alzheimer type. Neuropsychology, 19, 115-129. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0894-4105.19.1.115

Marsh, E. J., Tversky, B., &, Hutson, M.B. (2005). How eyewitnesses talk about events: Implications for memory. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 19, 531-544. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1095

Roediger, H. L., III, & Marsh, E. J. (2005). The positive and negative consequences of multiple-choice testing. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 31, 1155-1159. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0278-7393.31.5.1155

2004

Dudukovic, N. M., Marsh, E. J., & Tversky, B. (2004). Telling a story or telling it straight: The effects of entertaining versus accurate retellings on memory. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 18, 125-143. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.953

Luminet, O., Curci, A., Marsh, E., Wessel, I., Constantin, T., Gencoz, F., & Yogo, M. (2004). The cognitive, emotional, and social impacts of the September 11th attacks: Group differences in memory for the reception context and its determinants. The Journal of General Psychology, 131, 197-224. http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/GENP.131.3.197-224

Marsh, E. J. (2004). Story stimuli for creating false beliefs about the world. Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers, 36, 650-655. http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/BF03206546

Marsh, E. J., & Bower, G. H. (2004). The role of rehearsal and generation in false memory creation. Memory, 12, 748-761. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09658210344000170

Marsh, E. J., Dolan, P.O., Balota, D. A., & Roediger, H. L., III (2004). Part-set cueing effects in younger and older adults. Psychology & Aging, 19, 134-144. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0882-7974.19.1.134

Marsh, E. J., McDermott, K. B., & Roediger, H. L., III (2004). Does test-induced priming play a role in the creation of false memories? Memory, 12, 44-55. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09658210244000405

Marsh, E. J., & Tversky, B. (2004). Spinning the stories of our lives. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 18, 491-503. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1001

2003

Marsh, E. J., Meade, M. L., & Roediger, H. L., III (2003). Learning facts from fiction. Journal of Memory and Language, 49, 519-536. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0749-596X(03)00092-5

2001

Marsh, E. J., Edelman, G., & Bower, G. H. (2001). Demonstrations of a generation effect in context memory. Memory & Cognition, 29, 798-805. http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/BF03196409

2000

Tversky, B., & Marsh, E. J. (2000). Biased retellings of events yield biased memories. Cognitive Psychology, 40, 1-38. http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/cogp.1999.0720

1999

Marsh, E. J., & Bower, G. H. (1999). Applied aspects of source monitoring. Cognitive Technology, 4, 4-17.

Book Chapters

Marsh, E. J., & Drew, E. (in preparation). Correcting Errors and Misconceptions: The role of feedback in learning and understanding. Invited chapter to appear in J. Dunlowsky and K. Rawson (Eds.) Handbook of Cognition and Education. Cambridge University Press.

Marsh, E. J., & Yang, B. (in press). Believing Things That Are Not True: A Cognitive Science Perspective on Misinformation. Invited chapter to appear in B. Southwell (Ed.) Misinformation and Mass Audiences. University of Texas Press.

Marsh, E. J., & Arnold, K. (in press). Consequences of Storytelling and Essay-Writing for Learning and Memory. Invited chapter to appear in H. Taylor and J. Zacks (Ed.) Festscrift for Barbara Tversky.

Marsh, E. J., Cantor, A. D., & Brashier, N. M. (2016). Believing that humans swallow spiders in their sleep: False beliefs as side effects of the processes that support accurate knowledge. In B. Ross (Ed.) The Psychology of Learning and Motivation, volume 64. Academic Press.

Marsh, E. J., & Mullet, H. G. (2016). Stories and movies can mislead: Why Biloxi (Mississippi) sometimes relocates to Tennessee after reading The Great Gatsby. In R. Nash and J. Ost (Eds.) False and Distorted Memories. Psychology Press.

Marsh, E. J., & Cantor, A. (2014). Learning from the test: Dos and don'ts for using multiple-choice tests. Chapter 2 in M. A. McDaniel, R. F. Frey, S. M. Fitzpatrick, and H. L. Roediger (Eds). Integrating Cognitive Science with Innovative Teaching in STEM Disciplines [e-reader version). http://dx.doi.org/10.7936/K7Z60KZK

Marsh, E. J., & Umanath, S. (2014). Knowledge neglect: Failures to notice contradictions with stored knowledge . In D. N. Rapp and J. Braasch (Eds) Processing Inaccurate Information: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives from Cognitive Science and the Educational Sciences (p. 161-180) . MIT Press.

Marsh, E. J., & Butler, A. C. (2013). Memory in educational settings. In D. Reisberg (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of cognitive psychology (pp. 299-317). Oxford: Oxford University Press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195376746.013.0020

Marsh, E. J., & Roediger, H. L., III. (2013). Episodic and autobiographical memory. In A. F. Healy & R. W. Proctor (Eds.) Handbook of psychology: Volume 4, Experimental Psychology, 2nd edition (pp. 472-494). New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Brown, A. S. & Marsh, E. J. (2010). Digging into deja vu: Recent research on possible mechanisms. In B. H. Ross (Ed.), Psychology of learning & motivation (pp. 33-62). Burlington: Elsevier.

Roediger, H. L., III, Agarwal, P. K., Kang, S. H., & Marsh, E. J. (2010). Benefits of testing memory: Best practices and boundary conditions. In G. M. Davies and D. B. Wright (Eds.), New frontiers in applied memory (pp. 13-49). Brighton, UK: Psychology Press.

Roediger, H. L., III, & Marsh, E. J. (2009). False memories. Scholarpedia, 4(8):3858. http://dx.doi.org/10.4249/scholarpedia.3858

Marsh, E. J., Eslick, A. N. & Fazio, L. K. (2008). False memories. In H. L. Roediger III (Ed.), Cognitive Psychology of Memory. Volume 2 of Learning and Memory: A Comprehensive Reference, 4 volumes (J. Byme, editor) (pp. 221-238). Oxford: Elsevier.

Marsh, E. J. & Fazio, L. K. (2007). Learning from fictional sources. In J. Nairne (Ed.), The foundations of remembering: Essays in honor of Henry L. Roediger III (pp. 397-413). New York: Psychology Press.

Marsh, E. J. (2003). Memory: Myths, mysteries, and realities. In J. Guthrie (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Education, Second Edition (pp. 1605-1609). New York: Macmillan.

Roediger, H. L. III, & Marsh, E. J. (2003). Episodic and autobiographical memory. In A. F. Healy & R. W. Proctor (Eds.), Handbook of Psychology: Volume 4, Experimental Psychology (p. 475-497). New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Jacoby, L. L., Marsh, E. J., & Dolan, P. O. (2002). Forms of bias: Age-related differences in memory. In M. Naveh-Benjamin, M. Moscovitch, & H. L. Roediger, III (Eds.), Perspectives on human memory and cognitive aging: Essays in honour of Fergus Craik (p. 240-252). Philadelphia, PA: Psychology Press.

Roediger, H. L. III, Marsh, E. J., & Lee, S. C. (2002). Varieties of memory. In D .L. Medin & H. Pashler (Eds.), Stevens' Handbook of experimental psychology, third edition, volume 2: Memory and cognitive processes (pp. 1-41). New York: John Wiley & Son. http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203759707

Book Reviews

Marsh, E. J., & Eslick, A. N. (2009). Review of Why students don't like school? A cognitive psychologist answers questions about how the mind works and what it means for the classroom by Daniel T. Willingham. Educational Horizons, 87, 206-210.

Marsh, E. J., & Multhaup, K. (2007). Dual coding theory: It's not just for cognitive psychologists anymore. A review of Mind and Its Evolution: A Dual Coding Theoretical Approach by Allan Paivio. PsyCRITIQUES.

Marsh, E. J. & Fazio, L. K. (2006). Finding memory in hard-to-reach places. A Review of Why life speeds up as you get older: How memory shapes our past (ISBN 0-532-83424-4) by Douwe Draaisma. PsyCRITIQUES.

Books

Balota, D. A., & Marsh, E. J. (2004). Cognitive psychology: Essential Readings. Edited volume in the series Key Readings in Cognition, Psychology Press.